Academia

Aaaand we’re back! Oxford University to train Open Knowledge Ambassadors

This post was written by Martin Poulter, Wikimedian in Residence at Bodleian Libraries and published on the Bodleians’ blog. In a national first, Oxford University’s Bodleian Libraries and  IT Services are collaborating on a four-part course to help academics, students, and related staff work with Wikipedia. Oxford University staff and students will earn an ‘Open… read more »

First Welsh university edit-a-thon creates new articles on medieval women

This post was written by Robin Owain, WMUK’s Wales Manager, and originally published on the Wikimedia Foundation’s blog On 28 January 2015, Prof. Deborah Youngs and Dr Sparky Booker of Swansea University ran the first edit-a-thon at a university in Wales. The aim was to improve articles on women and reduce the gender gap on… read more »

Altmetrics and Wikipedia

‘Impact’ is a perennial concern for organisations, including Wikimedia chapters. Showing that what you’re up to makes a difference: contributing to free knowledge. It’s a familiar topic if you’re a researcher and can affect whether you get funding. It’s one thing to be able to say that your article has appeared in a journal with a… read more »

Women and Wikipedia Editathon, Swansea

This post was written by Prof. Deborah Youngs and Dr Sparky Booker of Swansea University On Wednesday 28th January, 2015, Prof. Deborah Youngs and Dr Sparky Booker of Swansea University ran the first editathon in Wales organised to improve articles on women on Wikipedia. This day was focussed on reducing the gender gap on Wikipedia… read more »

The truth gets its shoes on: the Black Death on Wikipedia

A recent article by @monicaMedHist identifies the disease in Royal 6 E VI, f 301, as leprosy: http://t.co/PmatI7obgF pic.twitter.com/ysEb3X9VNA — Medieval Manuscripts (@BLMedieval) January 13, 2015 This post was written by Richard Nevell Mark Twain said “A lie can travel half way around the world while the truth is putting on its shoes.” The same… read more »

Who writes Wikipedia’s health and medical pages and why?

By Nuša Farič, UCL, Centre for Health Informatics & Multiprofessional Education (CHIME) Half of the editors working on Wikipedia’s 25,000 pages of medical content are qualified medics or other healthcare professionals, providing reassurance about the reliability of the website, according to our newly published research results. Those editors, who are contributing their time for free, are… read more »

Using Wikipedia to open up science

This post was written by Dr Martin Poulter, Wikimedia UK volunteer and Wikipedian As part of Open Access Week, I’d like to explore some overlaps between Open Access and what we do in Wikimedia, and end with an announcement that I’m very excited about. We who write Wikipedia do not expect readers to believe something… read more »

Castles in the digital age

When you spend time on one of the busiest websites in the world it’s amazing what patterns emerge. A few weeks ago I was leafing through a borrowed copy of The Historian. It had been passed on to me because there was a piece about castles. As I leafed through its immaculately presented pages I… read more »

Let’s get serious about Wikipedia

This post was written by Dr Martin Poulter, Jisc Wikimedia Ambassador If you use Wikipedia to read about shell shock, look at the skeleton of a greater flamingo, or investigate the Enquiry into the Cost of the National Health Service, you benefit from scholarly content shared by academics or institutions. Over the last year, I’ve… read more »

Publishing scholarly papers with, and on, Wikipedia

This post was written by Dr Martin Poulter, Jisc Wikimedia ambassador Wikipedia welcomes expert contributions, and is one of the most direct ways to promote public understanding of a subject area, but it isn’t always in researchers’ personal interest to contribute. It may seem as though any time spent writing for Wikipedia is less time… read more »

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