Academia

The truth gets its shoes on: the Black Death on Wikipedia

A recent article by @monicaMedHist identifies the disease in Royal 6 E VI, f 301, as leprosy: http://t.co/PmatI7obgF pic.twitter.com/ysEb3X9VNA — Medieval Manuscripts (@BLMedieval) January 13, 2015 This post was written by Richard Nevell Mark Twain said “A lie can travel half way around the world while the truth is putting on its shoes.” The same… read more »

Who writes Wikipedia’s health and medical pages and why?

By Nuša Farič, UCL, Centre for Health Informatics & Multiprofessional Education (CHIME) Half of the editors working on Wikipedia’s 25,000 pages of medical content are qualified medics or other healthcare professionals, providing reassurance about the reliability of the website, according to our newly published research results. Those editors, who are contributing their time for free, are… read more »

Using Wikipedia to open up science

This post was written by Dr Martin Poulter, Wikimedia UK volunteer and Wikipedian As part of Open Access Week, I’d like to explore some overlaps between Open Access and what we do in Wikimedia, and end with an announcement that I’m very excited about. We who write Wikipedia do not expect readers to believe something… read more »

Castles in the digital age

When you spend time on one of the busiest websites in the world it’s amazing what patterns emerge. A few weeks ago I was leafing through a borrowed copy of The Historian. It had been passed on to me because there was a piece about castles. As I leafed through its immaculately presented pages I… read more »

Let’s get serious about Wikipedia

This post was written by Dr Martin Poulter, Jisc Wikimedia Ambassador If you use Wikipedia to read about shell shock, look at the skeleton of a greater flamingo, or investigate the Enquiry into the Cost of the National Health Service, you benefit from scholarly content shared by academics or institutions. Over the last year, I’ve… read more »

Publishing scholarly papers with, and on, Wikipedia

This post was written by Dr Martin Poulter, Jisc Wikimedia ambassador Wikipedia welcomes expert contributions, and is one of the most direct ways to promote public understanding of a subject area, but it isn’t always in researchers’ personal interest to contribute. It may seem as though any time spent writing for Wikipedia is less time… read more »

Wikipedia: Learning by sharing knowledge

This post was written by Martin Poulter. You can read the original here. Billions of people around the world crave education, but lack the resources we take for granted. Adequate libraries and current textbooks are out of their reach, but they are increasingly getting internet access. Meanwhile, every day in universities and schools, talented students are… read more »

Sphingonet and Wikipedia

This post was written by Richard Nevell. On 10 July, four trainers from Wikimedia UK travelled to Oxford to meet a group of doctoral and post-doctoral researchers. The idea of helping the group learn to edit was first floated in February this year by Luc Henry. As with many of the charity’s events, a lot… read more »

EduWiki 2012 – a review

The first week of September saw the first EduWiki Conference at the University of Leicester, England, bringing together educators and Wikimedians for two days to talk about the Wikipedia Education Program and other ways we can support each other. The keynote speakers were Annie Lin from the Wikimedia Foundation; Leigh Thelmadatter from ITESM Mexico; and… read more »

EduWiki kicks off amid great anticipation

There’s excitement in the air in Leicester this morning as our EduWiki Conference gets under way. Academics from three continents are meeting with Wikipedians and opinion-formers to discuss the use of Wikimedia projects, such as Wikipedia, in higher education. As well as universities, organisations represented include JISC and the Mozilla Foundation. Delegates will be examining the… read more »

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