Wikimedia Commons

Celebrate women in science with Wikipedia

This post was written by Martin Poulter, Wikimedian in Residence at the Bodleian Libraries, and was originally published on the library’s blog. This October will mark the bicentenary of Ada Augusta Byron, otherwise known as Ada Lovelace, often called the first computer programmer. Among the many events happening in Oxford this autumn, the Bodleian Libraries and IT… read more »

Wikimedia and UNESCO team up to share the world’s culture

By John Cummings, Wikimedia volunteer I have been working with the Sector for External Relations and Public Information unit at The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) to make images from their archive available on Wikimedia Commons, the media site for all Wikimedia projects including Wikipedia. Wikipedia is the most used educational resource in the… read more »

Vote for the Picture of the Year on Wikimedia Commons

This post was written by Wikimedia UK volunteer Livia Morarasu It’s that time of the year! The voting for the annual Wikimedia Commons Picture of the Year Contest is now open and there is plenty to marvel at. Last year a total of 981 pictures  were promoted to ‘featured picture’ status in categories ranging from plants and… read more »

Wellcome Library grateful for Wikimedia UK support

Wikimedia UK received a very encouraging email this morning which highlights the nature of the work of our movement. In a collaboration between the Wellcome Library, Wikimedia UK and Wikimedia volunteers, around 100,000 images from their collection have been uploaded to Wikimedia Commons. The message, from Phoebe Harkins of the Wellcome Trust, said: “The Wellcome… read more »

The winners of Wiki Loves Monuments 2014 in the UK

Have you seen the UK winners of the 2014 Wiki Loves Monuments competition? Wiki Loves Monuments is the global photography contest and the objective is to collect high quality photographs of some of the world’s most important historic sites. In the UK, this means listed buildings and scheduled monuments so there are possible subjects all over… read more »

Castles in the digital age

When you spend time on one of the busiest websites in the world it’s amazing what patterns emerge. A few weeks ago I was leafing through a borrowed copy of The Historian. It had been passed on to me because there was a piece about castles. As I leafed through its immaculately presented pages I… read more »

Falling to pieces: Wikipedia and history

This post was written by Richard Nevell, Assistant Office Manager Ruins are fascinating. From the columns of ancient Greece to the shattered remains of Coventry Cathedral, they evoke all sorts of emotions. Wonder, incredulity, nostalgia, reverence. During the 18th and 19th centuries they helped inspire romanticism. There’s an exhibition about them at the Tate: Ruin… read more »

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