Welcome to the Wikimedia UK blog!

Wacky Wiki Races!

By Martin Poulter, Wikimedian-in-Residence at Bodleian Libraries Wikipedia has more than five million articles in its English language version. No article is an island: with few exceptions, they have multiple incoming links as well as multiple links to other articles. Articles connect in a web, or like the cells in a brain. Take two widely… read more »

Thank you to everyone who volunteers for Wikimedia UK

In 2016 volunteers gave us a massive 20,000 hours of their time, from running events and teaching people how to edit to organising the UK branch of the world’s largest photography competition. Volunteers play a very important role in the charity’s work and shape our strategy. Putting in that much time shows that there our community… read more »

Reflections on a Wikipedia assignment – Reproductive Medicine

This was originally posted on Ewan McAndrew’s blog where he writes about his role as the University of Edinburgh’s Wikimedian in Residence Wikipedia as an important source of health information and not medical advice. “The Internet, especially Wikipedia, had proven its importance in everyday life. Even the medical sector is influenced by Wikipedia’s omnipresence. It has… read more »

#WMUKED17 – Wikimedia UK Education Summit: a roundup

By Lucy Crompton-Reid, Wikimedia UK Chief Executive I was delighted to be part of planning and delivering Wikimedia UK’s Education Summit in partnership with Middlesex University in February and wanted to share some notes, insights and presentations from that event with a broader audience than the 45 or so students, educators, academics and Wikimedians that… read more »

Guest post: Teaching competition law differently

This post was written by Dr Pedro Telles, Senior Lecturer in Law at Swansea University and originally published on his website. For the last couple of years with my colleague Richard Leonard-Davies I have been teaching competition law here at Swansea University and doing so in a very traditional and straightforward way: lectures focused on… read more »

Bunhill Fields: Wikimedia, gamification and richer media content

I really like Magnus Manske’s WikiShootMe tool. It visualises Wikidata items, Commons photos and Wikipedia articles on an OpenStreetMap. Wikidata items are shown as red if they have no photo and green if they do have one. For the past few months, I’ve been spending my lunch hours walking around the area near the Wikimedia… read more »

Wikipedia Vs Fake News

This article based on the text of Wikimedia UK’s submission to the government’s inquiry into fake news, which was launched in January. A changing media landscape The media landscape has changed beyond all recognition over the past 25 years. Before the internet, there were just a handful of media providers with large, guaranteed audiences and plenty… read more »

Why bots are important for Wikipedia

The Guardian recently picked up on a piece of research about the behaviour of bots on Wikipedia in the first 10 years of its history. The research noted that as bots became more common, their rules sometimes came into conflict with each other, resulting in some bots changing or reverting thousands of edits by other… read more »

How do Wikipedia editors decide what are reliable sources?

Over the past few weeks, Wikimedia UK has received a large number of press inquiries related to the Guardian’s article ‘Wikipedia bans Daily Mail as ‘unreliable’ source’. Now that the dust has settled on this story a little, we thought it might be helpful to clarify how the community of editors who create Wikipedia and… read more »

#1lib1ref at the University of Edinburgh

I’ve been interested in Wikimedia projects since taking part in the University of Edinburgh’s Women and Medicine editathon in February 2015, when I wrote an article on the Scottish doctor and women’s medical health campaigner Margaret Ida Balfour. I enjoyed researching her life and achievements and found it immensely rewarding and satisfying to see her… read more »

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