archaeology

Wikipedia’s photo competition Wiki Loves Monuments announces 2018 winners

The winners of the UK section of the world’s biggest photo contest Wiki Loves Monuments have just been announced, with the judges awarding fIrst prize to this stunning image of Gloucester Cathedral cloisters taken by Christopher JT Cherrington. Chris has written a short blog post on the Wiki Loves Monuments website explaining how he took… read more »

Recording heritage sites in danger with Wikipedia

I was scrolling Twitter when I came across a video of a fighter in Syria wasting ammunition to destroy an ancient Byzantine building. Jihadists in Idlib, Syria, destroy what’s left of a Byzantium era archaeological building in Deir Sunbul. The site is part of the “Dead Cities,” and is on UNESCO World Heritage List.https://t.co/LozBibwuIG pic.twitter.com/DE54KKOHQk… read more »

A guide to the past: hillforts and Wikimedia

What is the Atlas of Hillforts? Hillforts are enormous archaeological sites dotted around Britain and Ireland. There are some of the most impressive remains from prehistory. Just five years ago the best guess for how many there might be was ‘likely … over 4000’, but now thanks to the efforts of the University of Oxford… read more »

Open Archaeology and the Digital Cultural Commons

By Lorna M. Campbell, Wikimedia UK Board Member and OER Liaison – Open Scotland at the University of Edinburgh. Although I’ve worked in open education technology for almost twenty years now, my original background is actually in archaeology.  I studied archaeology at the University of Glasgow in the late 1980s and later worked there as… read more »

Announcing a new Wikimedian In Residence at the University of Oxford

The University of Oxford now employs a Wikimedian In Residence (WIR). Martin Poulter is working half-time on a one-year project to embed Wikipedia, Wikidata and related sites in the university’s teaching, research and public engagement. Dr Poulter served as the WIR at the Bodleian Libraries for one year ending in March 2016. He led wiki… read more »

Wiki Club: using Wikipedia as platform to shout about Scotland’s Heritage

This article was first published in Archaeology Scotland’s membership magazine and is reproduced with kind permission. Written by Doug Rocks-Macqueen, Cara Jones, Jeff Sanders and Leigh Stork. We all use (and love!) Wikipedia, but we are sometimes frustrated by the quality of the content on the Scottish Archaeology pages. We decided to do something about it… read more »

Altmetrics and Wikipedia

‘Impact’ is a perennial concern for organisations, including Wikimedia chapters. Showing that what you’re up to makes a difference: contributing to free knowledge. It’s a familiar topic if you’re a researcher and can affect whether you get funding. It’s one thing to be able to say that your article has appeared in a journal with a… read more »

Edit-on dudes: #ClassicsWomen are into Wikipedia

This post was written by Claire Millington, a Classics PhD student at Kings College London. It was first published on her blog here This week, after a lot of planning and persuading people to get involved, I ran a Wikipedia editathon to create and improve the pages of women who have been important to classics… read more »

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