heritage

“Masterpieces of the World” – A Landmark Partnership between Wikimedia UK and the Khalili Collections

Wikimedia UK is launching a landmark partnership with the UK-based Khalili Collections – one of the greatest and most comprehensive private collections in the world. Over the course of five decades, UNESCO Goodwill Ambassador Professor Nasser D. Khalili has assembled eight of the world’s finest art collections – each being the largest and most comprehensive… read more »

What happened on Wikipedia when Notre-Dame burned?

By Richard Nevell, Wikimedia UK Project Coordinator Shortly before 7pm on April 15 in Paris a devastating fire broke out in one of France’s most iconic buildings. The fire was extinguished after more than 12 hours, and while the stone walls still stood and movable artwork had been removed, the spire and roof had collapsed,… read more »

Green Men & Gargoyles: The Dumfries Stonecarving Project

Scotland Programme Coordinator Sara Thomas is working with tara s Beall, of the Dumfries Historic Buildings Trust, to support their new Stonecarving project. The project is funded by the Heritage Lottery Fund, Holywood Trust and the People’s Project, and runs from August 2018 to July 2019. I’ve known tara Beall for a while – our… read more »

Wikipedia’s photo competition Wiki Loves Monuments announces 2018 winners

The winners of the UK section of the world’s biggest photo contest Wiki Loves Monuments have just been announced, with the judges awarding fIrst prize to this stunning image of Gloucester Cathedral cloisters taken by Christopher JT Cherrington. Chris has written a short blog post on the Wiki Loves Monuments website explaining how he took… read more »

Recording heritage sites in danger with Wikipedia

I was scrolling Twitter when I came across a video of a fighter in Syria wasting ammunition to destroy an ancient Byzantine building. Jihadists in Idlib, Syria, destroy what’s left of a Byzantium era archaeological building in Deir Sunbul. The site is part of the “Dead Cities,” and is on UNESCO World Heritage List.https://t.co/LozBibwuIG pic.twitter.com/DE54KKOHQk… read more »

Open Archaeology and the Digital Cultural Commons

By Lorna M. Campbell, Wikimedia UK Board Member and OER Liaison – Open Scotland at the University of Edinburgh. Although I’ve worked in open education technology for almost twenty years now, my original background is actually in archaeology.  I studied archaeology at the University of Glasgow in the late 1980s and later worked there as… read more »

Falling to pieces: Wikipedia and history

This post was written by Richard Nevell, Assistant Office Manager Ruins are fascinating. From the columns of ancient Greece to the shattered remains of Coventry Cathedral, they evoke all sorts of emotions. Wonder, incredulity, nostalgia, reverence. During the 18th and 19th centuries they helped inspire romanticism. There’s an exhibition about them at the Tate: Ruin… read more »

Your local heritage is open to the public

This post was written by Richard Nevell. There are hundreds of local history and archaeology societies in the UK, and there’s a reason there were 50 million visits to heritage sites in England alone in 2010. Wiki Loves Monuments covers some headline attractions such as Edinburgh Castle and Westminster Abbey, but it also includes buildings… read more »

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