medieval

Wikimedia projects aren’t built in a day – Roman coinage on Commons

This article is based on a paper given at this year’s Museum Computer Group held at the Wellcome Trust on October 19th. Legacy and sustainability were two of the biggest issues York Museums Trust (YMT) grappled with when running two Wikimedian in Residence programmes with Wikimedia UK. During these residencies we made real progress and… read more »

First Welsh university edit-a-thon creates new articles on medieval women

This post was written by Robin Owain, WMUK’s Wales Manager, and originally published on the Wikimedia Foundation’s blog On 28 January 2015, Prof. Deborah Youngs and Dr Sparky Booker of Swansea University ran the first edit-a-thon at a university in Wales. The aim was to improve articles on women and reduce the gender gap on… read more »

Women and Wikipedia Editathon, Swansea

This post was written by Prof. Deborah Youngs and Dr Sparky Booker of Swansea University On Wednesday 28th January, 2015, Prof. Deborah Youngs and Dr Sparky Booker of Swansea University ran the first editathon in Wales organised to improve articles on women on Wikipedia. This day was focussed on reducing the gender gap on Wikipedia… read more »

The truth gets its shoes on: the Black Death on Wikipedia

A recent article by @monicaMedHist identifies the disease in Royal 6 E VI, f 301, as leprosy: http://t.co/PmatI7obgF pic.twitter.com/ysEb3X9VNA — Medieval Manuscripts (@BLMedieval) January 13, 2015 This post was written by Richard Nevell Mark Twain said “A lie can travel half way around the world while the truth is putting on its shoes.” The same… read more »

Castles in the digital age

When you spend time on one of the busiest websites in the world it’s amazing what patterns emerge. A few weeks ago I was leafing through a borrowed copy of The Historian. It had been passed on to me because there was a piece about castles. As I leafed through its immaculately presented pages I… read more »

Falling to pieces: Wikipedia and history

This post was written by Richard Nevell, Assistant Office Manager Ruins are fascinating. From the columns of ancient Greece to the shattered remains of Coventry Cathedral, they evoke all sorts of emotions. Wonder, incredulity, nostalgia, reverence. During the 18th and 19th centuries they helped inspire romanticism. There’s an exhibition about them at the Tate: Ruin… read more »

Sidebar